No Recognize

by Cy Dune

supported by
John Cratchley
John Cratchley thumbnail
John Cratchley In my quest for ever more William Tyler,I ended up at Lightning (do stream WT's 'Blue Ash Montgomery' from this site...it is stupendous!...and don't faint at the appended price tag!!).
This is a record label but also a kind of 'life statement',if you will...the music and their ethos go hand in hand (music and life lived under the radar,or on the periphery).
This is the second Cy Dune release;a short EP but only minimal in length and not in attitude ("take no prisoners")or viewpoint (Neal Cassady comes to mind).Cy is a force of nature,it appears from these recordings,and long may he continue to be so...This record doesn't hit the ground running...more akin to already breaking the sound barrier...
All the other releases on this label are outstanding...do please check them out (and also Issue 1 of Lightning Magazine...a good article by Rhys Chatham among others).
Lightning releases don't come often but they are really worth the wait...


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about

CY DUNE No Recognize ep

The Cy Dune story starts with a songbook. This particular book had a 100 songs written in 20th century american visionary long hand over 5 years after leaving home and traveling the world in what some might call the contemporary music scene of the early 21st century, recording and performing with his band Akron/Family and collaborating with Rhys Chatham, Michael Gira, William Parker, Hamid Drake, Keiji Haino and Tatsuya Nakatani. The songs were demoed all that same time with new and old friends in big city and small town apartments, parent’s garages, horse barns, Maine basements, New Jersey Synagogues , old Pennsylvania factories, molding midcentury moderns, Brooklyn basement studios and across the bridge at the midtown manhattan Sear studio with the old Abbey Road tape machine and the bass player from the Henry Rollins band.

In 2010 the 100 songs were finished, written and demoed. In 2011, he moved to the Sonoran desert to record a primitivist american blues story old/new weird American anthology of these songs with only an old acoustic guitar and the very same rebuilt ¼" tube Ampex reel to reel that Alan Lomax used to record field hollers out of his trunk. Months were spent fine tuning 100 songs, researching tube and tape saturation, Fahey’s discovery of Skip James and his mystical open D tuning, early Dylan cryptology, the notes between the notes of Leadbelly recordings, Michael Hurley’s Folkways First Songs and re-tuning all guitars to that self same slightly flat key.

But the 100 songs wouldn’t record.

2011 ended and the spark of change finally came as a Christmas gift given by his mother. Patti Smith’s Just Kids. Re-awed by the transformative powers of Rock n Roll, frustrated, fed up, he plugged in his guitar and the songs alived and ripped themselves into being, bursting out as sheets of guitar shredding sound like explosions written on the wall. Patti Smith’s book begins the year Coltrane died. Cy Dune’s story begins again with the simple act of plugging in his guitar, mimicking the thrust of the 20th century.

The No Recognize EP is a soundtrack to this transformation. His electric guitar story-tellings tap in, steeped with all the mystery of pre war weird America holler, African pentatonic shamanism, be bop underground, and Kerouac’s road verse electrified and amplified. The songs blaze like roads north to Chicago and Detroit, like amps falling off cars, the rattling tubes all saturated sound color and broken speaker blues, sounds of a whole century, like Wayne Coyne says, “touched by the religiousness of Rock n Roll”. No Recognize was recorded loud on a few old microphones in Tucson, AZ and in Brooklyn with the help of drummer Andrew Barker (William Parker, Gold Sparkle) and bassist Shazad Ismaily (Sam Amidon, Bonnie “prince” Billy), then doubled back and blasted through a friends broken PA high on a desert mountain. A Rock n Roll Hymnal 100 songs behind and 1000 songs to go.

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released May 7, 2015

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